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The Old Vet Tower. Massey University

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 There are those shots where you can play with the composition, experiment with shutter speed, get it right! Then there are those times when it happens in front of you. no planning and you barely have time to get the shot. That was today! I was on my way to a meeting, when I heard the sound of crunching concrete, of falling debris, of a powerful diesel engine. I looked at my watch, I had maybe 5 minutes to find a composition (not easy in this overgrown area) and capture the image. The exposure was 3 and a half minutes.... so I just had to get on with it. I like the image, and it is in some ways its an historic image at least for me. This building has been part of the Massey landscape for many decades. It is going to be missed.   

Keeping Watch

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A few weeks ago, I made a last minute decision to join my camera club on a weekend away. You know how it goes, previously made plans fall through which gives opportunities for other things. The trip was quite brief, just two nights, but the forecast looked reasonable. I spent most of my time with Vicky and Pieter, we laughed, we wandered and we even found some interesting new places to photograph. Thanks to both of you for being so patient when my exposures drifted into the multi minute territories I enjoy so much. I have said this a few times and I will say a lot more in the future, I love how the unconverted 6D I have allows me to shoot long exposures no matter what time of day it is. The first image I want to share with you is from Lake Taupo. This was captured at around midday, on a bright sunny warm day. The waves lapped at my feet, the lake was a buzz with the sound of boats and jet ski's. But all of that fades into the background for this image. Why this composition, because

Floating

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 If there is one aspect I love about infrared above all else, it's the power to transform. Shooting in infrared is a technique, it in itself will not create a magical image. But the way it can change a scene, enhance it. The way it can bring out some items, while hiding others, makes it such a useful tool in the toolbox. I found this little scene at the beautiful Greenhaugh Gardens near Palmerston North. As winter has now turned to spring and the gardens are beginning to wake from their winter slumber, I like how the greens are beginning to change. This is where this infrared capture on my unconverted Canon 6d has come to shine. The longer shutter speed (10 minutes in this case as the clouds were quite heavy with the odd shower passing through) and the way the infrared capture has highlighted the lilypad's while darkening the water, has transformed this image in a way that 'normal' light didn't. I look forward to many more visits to this beautiful gardens and enjoyi

Coming Into Leaf

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 Just a quick post today. After yesterdays success, I decided to head back down to the domain this afternoon for my lunch break. The conditions were even better today with less wind and more warmth. By going a different way I found this nice composition. I like how the trees are changing each day at the moment. 720nm Infrared filter, Exposure 180 seconds, F16 ISO, 100 Channel swapped in Photoshop

Exploring New Tools - Magic Lantern

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 This will be the third summer I have photographed in infrared. In the past two years I have noticed a trend. I am not sure if it is specific to infrared or more based in my nature. I find my interest in photographing in infrared wanes over the winter, comes to life in spring (with a bit of effort). Then in late summer or autumn I come into the possession of a new piece of gear, but too late to really get familiar with it.   The first summer, after exploring the possibilities of infrared, I managed to find a 77mm 720nm filter. The 77mm thread allowed me to use better lenses with a wider range of focal lengths, but with shipping delays it only arrived in April. Then last autumn, through a bizarre chain of events, I purchased the canon 6D which spawned this blog. Just because it hasn't been the greatest light to photograph with, it doesn't mean I have been idle. Quite the contrary. I have been getting to know the 6D better, the positives and the things I miss from my Canon 80D. I

Virginia Lake Part 2

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 When people first use a camera, they are full of hope. They expect to see the images they capture look exactly like they did when they pressed the button. This expectation is so powerful, that to most it's not till they look closer they see the difference. This can lead to frustration, and for some a learning curve that allows them to master the skill. With time and experience we learn to use that difference to our advantage. We learn to use the flaws and short comings to see the world in a more creative way. To see things our eyes cannot see unaided. Longer exposure times allow us to see the passage of time. Faster lenses allow us to separate the subject from the surroundings and see the wonders of the night sky. Through the use of filters we can see wavelengths of light far outside the normally visible range.   This is the power of photography, as Marcel Proust put it "not in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes.". To see the world as it is, not the world we glan

Virginia Lake - Whanganui

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 Virginia Lake in Autumn is a beautiful place to spend a few hours. Warm sunshine on your back, autumn colours adorning the trees. To top it all off, Les had found time in his weekend to join me for the afternoon walk. But as we began our walk, the clouds filled in, and that beautiful sunshine became a more fleeting prospect. That wasn't part of the plan! The weather forecast had promised broken cloud.    With the unconverted 6D, the lower light levels made live view focusing a lot more challenging. So the change of light would mean a change in approach. Actually it was an idea I had been considering anyway so in some ways I suppose it was a great time to test it. What was the new approach? Remove the filter from the lens, explore, compose, focus (using the infrared mark), then reattach the filter and photograph. This approach will take more time, but on the other side it is like taking your camera off a tripod to compose the next shot, it allows you to be more intentional.   Of co